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outspoken about human rights in russia. "she has been traveling with a business contingent of her trip has not just been about the euro. the ruble. >> they passed a resolution that underscored fears about the kremlin's commitment. >> vladimir putin as an less than happy to hear the criticism. clutched kendel merkel was expecting a chilly reception and. >> at a joint conference with business leaders, questions from the audience quickly turned to what many here see as an increasingly critical tone that germany and europe are taking with russia. >> she was surprisingly candid in her assessment. >> she said, we are concerned and it is my view as well that the kremlin has adopted a series of laws that do not do anything to promote principles such as the right of political groups to organize freely. she highlighted the two-year prison sentence given to members of the rock band pussy riot as a decision europeans could not understand. he said they were not track actively suppress civil society and talked about the growing tensions. he said, we disagree, arguing, and search for compromise but there
, his efforts are already having an effect. >> in russia, a new law has come into force, requiring organizations that receive funding from abroad to register as foreign agents. dam it conscious of the days of the cold war, and the affected groups are not at all happy about those implications. >> many plan to boycott the law, including an election watchdog. >> this russian election watchdog now has to declare itself a foreign agent because it receives funding from the u.s. and europe. >> it is clear to us that any group that does not register as an agent and is viewed as a nuisance by the state apparatus will be first to be put through the wringer by the authorities. >> the new law passed through parliament during the summer with virtually no public outcry. it is backed by the ruling united russia party, which is allied to president vladimir putin. supporters of the law say it is simply a way to identify groups involved in russian politics who use funds from overseas. >> i do not think it is repression. it is just a way of classifying politically active citizens groups. may be someo
edge -- >> questions to editor she mentioned the cold war. the request and asking what role does russia play in the world going forward. >> it is -- in a challenge of the finding its identity under totally different circumstances. russia has been an imperial power and it has had domestic support by its efforts in asia, the middle east and europe, depending on where it was, now russia has the problem of a declining population. declining russian population and muslim population that is forward of the muslim world. 3,000 miles from china which is based tricky dick nightmare in the sense that there are thirty million russians are on one side and 1 billion chinese on the other end the middle east which is an ideological nightmare and in europe, a historically difficult one for them so how -- and yet the image russia has of its leadership is that they have to be considered as a principal country in order to be taken seriously so fundamentally russia has to look for a pattern of cooperation but found methods of doing it but russia is not strategic to the west, bringing pressure on its neighbor
and acquitted. two croatian generals are walking free. and the brutal life as a slave in modern russia. >> the shop owner between a lot and hit me once nonstop for hours and even she hit me when i was pregnant. she had no mercy. london, 7:00y in a.m. in washington, and it's 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem and gaza, where the egyptian prime minister has called for immediate intervention to bring about an end to the violence which he has blamed on israel. he held a meeting with the hamas prime minister in gaza and there's a truce. israel says 50 rockets were fired into southern israel in that time and it launched further strikes on gaza in return. sirens have been sounded in tel aviv where two rockets were fired on the city. now to an israeli border town to join my colleague ben. >> rockets have been fired into this town a few kilometers from israel-gaza border. the sirens sounded five minutes ago. before that, an hour ago. normally the rockets are intercepted by the israel anti- missile shield, but one of them did get through to my lef andt and landed in open ground, not injuring anyone. two hav
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
by china, russia and iran that would give the united nations control over the internet. we'll see what this week's u.n. vote could mean for your usage of the net here in america. >>> and a victim of superstorm sandy who got a personal promise from the president, now speaking out and calling the president's trip to new jersey, a big waste of time. >>> as we await the white house press briefing the senate bracing itself for possible confirmation hearings on u.s. ambassador susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. the buzz on this is growing but could the benghazi debacle sink her chances and should it? we'll have a fair and balanced debate on that next. >> i think if he does, it could be, that kind of arrogance which is what i think it would be could be his undoing, because if she is put under oath and forced to go through and answer all these questions about benghazi i think it will put the administration in a really bad position ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting u
, this group from russia has come in, or this group of jews have come in. i'm sorry, but we're taking this mountain." i mean, we heard over and over, "you see that community up there on that hill? well, a year ago, that was arab territory." there's still this business of, "sorry, you have to move on." and when you think about the situation of the indigenous peoples of this continent and how, "well, here's your reservation. no, i'm going to move further"- they're still getting pushed around, and that's messing with their mind, ethically. yeah, janet? >> right now what they're doing, i think, is they're refusing construction permits for palestinian houses, so you can't add a room addition on to your house while they're building those new subdivisions for the other people. so they're squeezing them that way- they're saying, "well, we don't care if your son or daughter got married and now you need more- no, you can't build onto your house." >> and as virginia said, it's not having rights, and without rights, you can't obey your obligations, you can't obey your responsibilities, and it put
blast of cold air coming in out of eastern china, also eastern russia here. you see all that cloud cover coming in. well, that's actually producing some snowfall on top of what you already saw over the weekend in portions of northern honshu, even off towards hokkaido. it's not just the snowfall here. some severe weather is erupting along the cold front. you could be seeing strong to thunderstorms here, even a tornado or two cannot be completely ruled out with this storm system as it continues to push overhead. the good news, it is pushing off to the east and much of western japan, even on the east coast around tokyo, you're going to be seeing drier weather in place mainly due to a high pressure continuing to ridge in fro the west, actually across much of china you're already seeing fair weather in place here. that cold air from the north is creating dense and heavy fog. do slow down on the roads if you're out there driving about. but some afternoon thunderstorms still going to be popping up here and also down towards the philippines and the indochina peninsula. for the tropics, temperatu
and russia and they do of mexico. what is going on? >> there was a poll that showed most americans see mexico was a problem. they see mexico, they think of drugs, poverty, corruption. they do not see what mexico has become. security is an issue but they miss many of the other parts, the economic boom over the 20 plus years. >> some 6 million americans owe their jobs to trade relations with mexico. >> exactly. what goes under the radar is how tight the economy as. mexico is our number 2 destination below canada. an estimated 6 million american jobs depend on mexico. if mexico is doing well, so are the u.s. jobs. >> to you think they realize their jobs are dependent on the mexican economy? >> i do not. i think this poll shows the lack of understanding. many people had a negative view. almost as many people said, i do not know. they do not have enough information to say something about the country to the south. part of that is a lack of understanding of how important the economic ties are between the nations. >> most americans think about mexico, when they think about a comment illegal immigrati
? palestinians may soon have an answer. labs in russia, france and switzerland will conduct separate tests of bone samples taken today. muslim clerics gave permission to open his grave. it was a delicate process kept out of sight. >> it was important for the palestinians to emphasize that no foreign hands touched the remains of yasser arafat, only the palestinians touched him. a matter of honor. the last time arafat was seen in public he flew to a paris hospital age 75 and sick. three weeks later he was dead. why? his wife refused an autopsy. rumors flew, aids murdered, poisoned, that's what many palestinians believed. >> all the circumstantial evidence, all the political evidence indicate only one direction, which is mr. sharon. >> reporter: israel denies it. there was no real evidence he had been killed, until this year. the investigation was triggered by swiss technicians working with al jazeera tv. they examined arafat's toothbrush and hat and found traces of radioactive polonium 210. ten times more toxic than cyanide. the question now is, will they find it on his bones? >> the likelih
coming in from russia, switzerland and france under the mantle of the palestinian authorities are going to open the grave this coming week. they're going to take samples and shut the grave again on the same day. it's a very emotional day for palestinians because he is this overarching palestinian figure, but also a very, very interesting and almost exciting forensic case as well, victor. >> we know that the investigative committee held a news conference a short time ago. what more are we learning about how they're moving forward? >> reporter: well, they said they're moving forward in a way that, first of all, they pushed back the date for when the grave was going to be opened. they then went through the motions how all of this is going down. they said there's going to be a very ceremonial opening of the grave, then they're going to take the samples and then arafat is going to be laid to rest again with a religious ceremony and a military ceremony as well. that's sort of the process that's going to go on. what's going to happen is these three forensic teams, the russian, french and swiss
to let countries control the internet contact in their own borders. russia is backing that. some arab countries are pushing for identification of all internet users. some developing nations are asking to be have individual websites pay to reach users across internal borders. changes to the open internet policy could three new sensorship and give new ammunition to countries that try to silence critics in iran or china. the united states government opposes all the changes. as do tech giants like google, facebook, and microsoft. officials with the u.n. group say this has nothing to do with sensorship but they want to update the country treaty which has stayed the same since 1988 long before the internet became such a household term. long before we used it. and now the counterterrorism and computer crime analyst who is live with us this afternoon. you start reading this stuff and it is this weird soup. what, exactly, are they doing? >>guest: well, this is atlas shrugged. they are trying to do it under "we want to tax" and it is certain things about revenue and the sender pays but it boils
efforts to persuade russia d china to work with us at the u.n. security council. i will take every opportunity to urge my russian and chinese colleagues to support the political and diplomatic solution to the conflict in syria. without such a solution everything that they and we most fear is coming closer, including ever-greater loss of life, instability in neighboring countries and an opportunity for extremists to pursue their own ends. the basis for such a political settlement is clear: a credible alternative to the assad regime is emerging that has the growing support of the arab league, the european union, the united states and an in's cooing number -- increasing number of countries, and we have an agreed basis for transition which all permanent members of the u.n. security council signed up to in june. but in the absence of that political and diplomat you can solution, we will not rule out any option, and in accordance with international law where it might save innocent lives in syria and prevent the destabilization of a region that remains critical to the security ofhe united
in the countries, brazil, russia, india, bringing in europe, and do real nation building through economic means so you don't end up having a cold war with china or russia or entering a new gray war with al qaeda or intervention in syria or war with iran. let us hope those are not the foreign policy markers of a second term. he has a chance here. not for cold war with china, but to rebuild because china's going through terrible social instability, economic growth is plummeting. a whole series of issues to unit. >> it's worth mentioning the president announced the return of the u.s. to the tune of 170 million for projects over the next two years and that is something i'm sure the burmese welcome with open arms, but at the end of the day i think he probably could have gone with empty hands and still receive the reception he had which was people flooding the streets. reports of six and seven people deep on the sidewalks as his motorcade passed by. >> that's right. china has been offering a lot of cash, doing a lot of projects there. a lot of chinese business people in burma. china very much wants acce
. experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains also looking for a possible pulonium concentration. the samples will be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france, and it's unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yassir arafat remains a towering figure for palestinians. but despite wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. i don't support the exhumation process, this man says. because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him, as long as it is done by professionals and in full respect of the leader. >> reporter: of course, i am against it, he says. it is insulting to the martyr and to the palestinian people. the palestinian authority has accused israel of being behind any poisoning of arafat. a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it's not clear if pelonium can be traced eight years after the palestinian leader's death. but if heightened levels are found, the next
the experts from russia, france, and switzerland join the palestinians in taking specimens of yasser arafat's remains. they're going to study those specimens in their laboratories in their countries. they say it will take three months to get a full result. and then they'll know how he died. now the claims that he was murdered, if he was murdered, he was poisoned, became -- well, you know, for eight years, no one really dealt with the issue until al jazeera tv earlier this year did a documentary reporting that they have confirmed that he died of poisoning of plutonium 210, the same allegedly used to kill a spy turned can dissident. if he was poisoned with with mew tone yum, who did it? if it turns out he was poisoned, they need to find out who did it and that's a whole different investigation. i guess it becomes a criminal investigation as opposed to this kind of medical examination. >> and, martin, who is doing this investigation right now? who is in charge of this decision to exhume his body? >> reporter: well, you know, there was great pressure after that al jazeera documentary on arafat'
statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's a cyberdefense center both selection. estonia is the most connected country in europe. they are a leader in the government. that's when of the reasons why estonia is super interesting. i don't know how much my time -- am i good? >> you are good. >> i'm going to spend a couple minor on other ones. okay, so there's lots of incidents in my side of e-mail, targeted attacks to u.s. satellites. it looks like someone from china. i'm not saying chinese government, but someone through china for mr. cheney servers appear to have been doing the proof of concept. they were trained to see whether they could get him into the
, france, and russia. the results of the investigation aren't expected for several months but arafat's body will be immediately reburied with full military honors. palestinians are convinced israel supplied the poison. bedali is more interested in finding out if they had help from palestinian collaborators. >> a body has to be respected. we should know who did it and i don't think that by taking of his body they will know it. >> reporter: in the meantime, his image remains useful. it held pride of place at a demonstration to support a bid to gain observer status at the united nations for the palestinian state arafat spent his life trying to create two days after he was to be dug up and reburied. allen pizzey, cbs news, ramallah. >>> in massachusetts, officials are blaming a utility worker for a massive natural gas explosion. the blast friday night injured 18 people and damaged 42 buildings in springfield. the state fire marshal says the worker was responding to a gas leak when he accidentally punctured an underground pipe. and immediately called the fire department. >>> coming up mention, y
to be happening. so what's going to happen is that this coming tuesday the investigators from france, russia, as well as switzerland, are going to open yasser arafat's grave. they are going to take samples from yasser arafat ebody, and then they are going to shut the grave as well. all of this will have big ceremonial character. there will be a religious ceremony when the grave is opened. there will be a military ceremony, and the same is going to be happening when yasser arafat is laid to rest again. the whole thing, they say, is all going to happen in one day, so it won't take very long, but what the palestinian authority has left open is how long the actual investigation of the samples is going to take. all of the samples are separately going to be taken to russia, france and switzerland, to the labs there, to be analyzed, and it's unclear how long this analysis is going to take. however, if it does come to light that yasser arafat was indeed poisoned with the radioactive substance polonium that will, of course, cause massive emotional reactions here. and already the investigation is a ve
in a different america, they'll grow up in a fundamentally different world, a world ordered by china or russia or most likely nobody at all. so there's a lot at stake here in how our economy grows and develops. part of that is going to require pulling back from missions that are completely out of proportion like afghanistan. but it's also remembering one thing: we have one unique thing that the chinese and rsians n't have. we can lead by emulation. the chinese have to buy people, the russians have to bludgeon people and when we get it right, when people see us as the greatest place to get an education, start a company and get a job the effect that has in expanding our power and influence is exponential. >> rose: where does american leadership express itself in terms of going beyond its own borders. david? >> first the old-fashioned truth is power does matter and litary does matter. we'll have a military presence for that. dealing with iran is going to be the number one issue the next president faces. and then finally-- and i think this again-- the blurring between that policy is that we have a
to be ready to go to the mat to make sure the assad regime will stay in power. that is russia and iran. the result could be an assad that stays in power, an iranian victory that will mark the good for our efforts to move iran to the negotiating table on nuclear weapons, and, in wide portions of syria, and no man's land like the somalia were militants associate with al-qaeda will find a new home. we already see some of this. this is another reason why the administration needs to engage through military means of necessary directly or indirectly providing weapons and things like no-fly zones. we need to do more urgently and this thing will slip out of control. at best, in syria, we will see an emerging shia-sunni fissure across the middle east that will be followed by fighting. but a touch on iraq -- it has not received too much commentary you -- either in the debates in the campaign or even in some of the discussions about the post-election foreign policy priority but it needs to be a priority for several reasons. iraq is a success. it is because of the efforts of the united states and o
. now a team scientists from russia, switzerland and france will try and determine if the poisoning was the underlying cause of death. if ingested a quantity of the it can am deadly. it destroys dna, the immune system and major organs. but detection, it's not that simple. the drug dekays quickly. losing its radioactive in 2 1/2 years. remember, arafat now has been dead for eight years. scientists anding his remains say it will take at least three months before they have any results and those results could be inconclusive. yasser arafat, he was controversial in life and he remains so now in death. shep. >> shepard: david lee miller in jerusalem. powerball fever has the winning jackpot topping half a billion dollars tonight. lottery officials say it's likely to get bigger. as for your chances of winning, well, we'll crunch those numbers next. plus, don't want to put your aging parents in a nursing home, right? so why not just let them live in the backyard? we'll have that for you just ahead ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the
. >> john: you grew up in russia. >> grew up in russia. didn't have the hostess. came here. >> john: you eat only healthy food. >> that's right. other russian flavors hostess doesn't make. so i've steered clear. and my understanding is nobody really -- i don't really understand, nobody still eats hostess as a practice of -- if we want baked goods we buy hostess. am i wrong? >> john: no one eats hostess caifntle. >> they do eat the coast es cakes but it is not seen as a delicious dessert. >> john: it is. twinkies have a shelf life of seven years because they have so many preservatives in them. i want to feed someone nothing but twinkies the last ten years of their life and see how long it takes their body to decompose when they die. between twinkies and ho hos which dick morris is a fan and chock codials, i don't know if they make those anymore but the cupcakes are still huge. hostess sells wonder bread so maybe you don't have kids -- >> don't have kids. >> john: children still love this crap. >> childre
diplomacy. this is something that really works. i try to expand it to russia, which i think is kind of a cool idea, but got shut down by the embassy. but at any rate, it's a great idea, needs to be bigger. used to be the chairman of the bbc. has been impossible mission -- and possible because this has to do two things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile, although in my view it's an excellent job of records failing. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. number two, it is a real, journalistic institution that needs to abide by normal journalistic principles. so how can he do both of those the same time? well, it is hard especially if you have members of congress who don't understand what the law actually says. so i've actually come around to the view, which i never stated before and i kind of have resisted this for a long time. they really do think it needs to be much more -- needs to be brought into the broader foreign policy making apparatus of the united states government. otherwise i don't think it's going to survive. so i think that tension needs
're not taking any more land. but oh, this group from russia has come in, or this group of jews have come in. i'm sorry, but we're taking this mountain." i mean, we heard over and over, "you see that community up there on that hill? well, a year ago, that was arab territory." there's still this business of, "sorry, you have to move on." and when you think about the situation of the indigenous peoples of this continent and how, "well, here's your reservation. no, i'm going to move further"- they're still getting pushed around, and that's messing with their mind, ethically. yeah, janet? >> right now what they're doing, i think, is they're refusing construction permits for palestinian houses, so you can't add a room addition on to your house while they're building those new subdivisions for the other people. so they're squeezing them that way- they're saying, "well, we don't care if your son or daughter got married and now you need more- no, you can't build onto your house." >> and as virginia said, it's not having rights, and without rights, you can't obey your obligations, you can't obey your re
and from russia. they have palestinians have studied at the universities there. they've taken this technology home. this is widespread grad rocket technology. >> this becomes a ground war, i asked ben the same question, this changes how? >> it changes in terms of civilian casualties. it's unavoidable if you put that much firepower in there. >> jim clancy, thank you very much. st stay tuned for the latest on the violence in the mideast. first, though, we'll tell you about this heart warnlg story about coming home for the holidays. [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. wanted to provide better employee benefi
to his world view, whether it's in the middle east, the cairo speech, about china, russia, things like that. this was another one, i think, in that line of speeches, people really want ed to understand th obama doctrine if they read all of these speeches together almost in a little book form they would get a better understanding of the president's world view. i would assume a lot of people already believe they have that understanding. he's off to cambodia and then it's back home because he has to pardon that turkey. i'll see you soon. >> thanks, chuck. even across the world in asia, the president can't escape washington. at a buddhist monastery he joked that geshgs 0s on the fiscal cliff may require a little help in the almighty. >> yes, we're working on this budget. we're going to need a lot of prayer. >> also on the president's plate a developing fight over who removed language and talking points given to susan rights that suggested al qaeda may have been behind the terrorist attack in libya? >> it went to the so-called deputy's committee that's populated by appointees from the admin
on tuesday? forensic scientists from france, russia, and switzerland will exhume the body of the late palestinian leader. then what they're going to do is take samples and test it for poisoning. arafat will be then reburied that same day in religious and military ceremonies. rumors and speculation have continued ever since arafat died suddenly in 2004 at age 75 that he may have been poisoned. >>> a newspaper editor has quit his job over topless photos of catherine, the duchess of cambridge. meeblg o'kane resigned this weekend. in september the irish paper was one of several european papers that published pictures of the duchess sun bathing topless. the photos ignited a storm of controversy and sparked legal action by the british royal family. >>> if members of congress truly want to reach across the aisle, the place to start might be between each politician's ears. why the brain may be key to bipartisansh bipartisanship. >>> but, first, a question for all you political junkes watching this morning. what was the highest margin income tax rate in u.s. history? the highest. if you know t
, specimens of his remains are going to be sent to three labs, separate investigations in russia, switzerland and france where they will be investigating looking for traces of polonium or any other kinds of poison. to answer that question, how did arafat die? because there was never any public report of his medical report. his wife kept it secret. no one knows what really led to his death although they know he had a stroke. that's the issue, how did he die? the suspicion is, he was poisoned. the fingers pointed at israel. now maybe we'll find out. the scientists it will take them about three months before they have their results. israel's convinced they'll find natural causes. sorry. >> i was just saying, you and i remember, you better than anyone, from being there, and i remember covering the funeral, that there had been a lot of talk about arafat's being ill, his weakness, about his leadership, but it really is fascinating that in the intervening years and intervening eight years, the palestinians have divided between hamas and fatah more critically and really is a vacuum of leadership. >>
into three, and each set of investigators from russia, france and switzerland took their 20 samples. they'll be doing separate investigations, and then they correlate the results to the end and we'll see whether they will agree or whether there's any dispute. there's a lot riding on this, of course. >> martin fletcher live in tel aviv. thank you. >>> new allegations involving former elmo puppeteer kevin clash. it tops our look at stories around the "news nation" today. a third lawsuit accuses clash of having sex with an underage boy. the latest accuser said he began a relationship with clash back in 2000. he was 16 years old at the time. a spokes woman for clash says, quote, mr. clash believes this lawsuit has no merit. a fast-moving storm is going across the mid-atlantic today. heavy rain, sleet and snow is hitting several stalts from west virginia to massachusetts. hundreds of car accidents have been reported throughout the region. many schools have closed. the powerball jackpot just got sweeter. the prize for tomorrow's drawing -- it's tomorrow? we have to get a ticket. it's now a reco
in the russians had behaved, i don't think we can give up on russia because they do know the syrian military there in getting bashar al-assad out of the country is not going to solve all the problems. if he leaves, particularly if he were to leave tomorrow, let's say, you would have fragmentation in syria for both sides this is an existential struggle. and alawite dominated army is not going to give up because bashar gave up. and the competition is not going to lay down their arms because bashar less. so i think we very much, if there's going to be any hope for resolution that keeps syria impact for the time being we need the russians, and we need putin, and we need them to recognize that their nihilistic attitude right now doesn't play well. and i would suggest that a number of countries might do better by putting pressure on russia rather than excoriating the united states. i do believe in military intervention. i think we could very well find ourselves backing one side and then only to find that we're incapable of stopping them from occurring the other side if they defeat them. we've seen
it to russia which i think is a cool idea. i got shutdown by the embassy. it is a great idea. in needs to be bigger. the bbg has an impossible to is as to do twoeared things at the same time that are very difficult to reconcile. in my view they have done an excellent job of reconciling its. number one, it is a tool of american foreign policy. it is a real journalistic institution. in need to abide by normal journalistic principles. talking to both of those things? it is hard for those who do not understand what the law actually says. i have, around to the view that the bbg needs to be brought into the broader foreign-policy making apparatus of the united states government. other was i just do not think it is going to survive. i think that attention needs to be resolved one way or another pie. the way it works now is that we used to sit down a summit people from our state wants are twice a year and see what is on your mind? i hope when i was under the secretary of there was more guidance. i think there needs to be. the second thing is that there needs to be a reorganization of the bbg.
of the palestinian leader's belongings. now experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains, also looking for a possible concentration. the process will only take a few hours but samples will then be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france and it's unclear when the first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yaszer arafat remains a powering figure for palestinians. but denight wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. >> translator: i don't support the process this man says because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him as long as it is done by professionals and in full respect of the leader. >> of course i'm against it, he says. it is insulting to martyr and to the palestinian people. >> reporter: the palestinian authority accused israel of being behind poisoning of arafat, a claim the israeli government refuses to comment on. it is not clear if it can be traced on the remains eight years after the palestini
in power and maintain control over at least part of syria and that of course is russia and iran and the result would be al-assad steven pour and the victory which is not going to be good for our simultaneous efforts to try to move iran to the negotiating table to seize the nuclear weapons, and in white portions of syria, a no-man's land rather like the fata of somalia where the militants perhaps probably associated with al qaeda would find a new home. we already see some of this. this is another reason why the administration needs to engage in putting in beijing through military means if necessary the merkley or indirectly through providing weapons and things like no-fly zones. we need to do more and we need to do more urgently or this is great to slip out of control. at best -- and it isn't very good at sifry at salles -- at worst we are going to see any emerging sunni shia fisher across the middle east would be followed by violence and fighting in iraq and elsewhere. let me touch on iraq. it hasn't received too much commentary either in the debates in the campaign or even some
this week at a zoo in russia. unfortunately, their birth mother abandoned them, so this shepherd dog stepped in to nurse the little cubs. it's not been the first time the tiger mom refused to feed her babies. it happened five months ago when she gave birth to two cubs. the zoo staff was prepared this time, brought in the dog to help, and the little cubs, well, they are happy campers. arthel: i mean, as if pictures weren't enough, the vocals just kill me. i love it so much. very nice. jon: yeah, that's mom. mom doesn't look too happy, but the cubs are happy. arthel: tsa why we love dogs -- that's why we love dogs. thanks for having me. jon: it's been fun having you here today. i guess now we have to go shopping, right? arthel: yes, we do, and what are we eating? grass-fed beef. jon: see you later on the fox report, 7 p.m. eastern tonight. thank you for joining us. arthel: "america live" starts right now. rick: and we begin with a fox
, switzerland and russia will take samples to test for possible poisoning. mr. arafat's body will then be reburied in the west bank. palestinian officials hope the test will clear up questions over whether arafat's death in 2004 was the result of poi zonk by a radioactive substance. >>> let's get back to the middle east now. there is a cease-fire in place. that is good for now. but the violence could easily spark up again without a long-term solution. joining me now, a former palestinian negotiator and adviser for palestinian president mahmoud abbas. now she is at the institute for middle east understanding. good morning to you what. do you see is the most important issue for palestinians? >> good morning. well, i think if we're going to be honest and move forward, then we're going to have to begin to address israel's 45-year military occupation, and in particular, it's ongoing siege and blockade of the gaza strip. that's with respect to gaza. but in terms of the bigger picture, it's not just a question of gaza, but also a question of israel finally ending its military rule o
. or the understanding and i'm sad about this, because i go to russia a lot, that the russian who is come to israel like lieberman have driven the country even further to the right. working at a mass zeen as i do that fought for the creation of the state of israel, pushed president truman who didn't want to the care for israel, there are many jews in this country whose voices aren't being heard. because apec remains the right wing likud voice. a new group j street which first endorsed congressman cohen. you need a sense of a range of israeli voices which we're not hearing now in israel because of nationalism. >> because people hunker down. >> there are people like norm shazeff who was here last week they want a different kind of israel and they're trying to fight for that moral quarter. >> no longer the case in the new post era after we take a break. and we got onesies. sometimes miracles get messy. so we use tide free. no perfumes or dyes for her delicate skin. brad. not it. not it. just kidding. that's our tide. what's yours? >>> there's a certain theory that i think popular in washington, d.c. foreig
as a stroke. now scientists from russia, switzerland and france will try to determine if loan yum poisoning was the cause. to loan yum emits deadly radiation that destroys human tissue, and though it cannot penetrate the stint if it's ingested, it does affect the organs. that is something israel denies. now, as for these tests, at the end of the day they might prove inconclusive. the poison decays very quickly, less than three years. arafat has been buried now for eight years. it is very possible, according to some investigators, that these results might tell us nothing at all. megyn? megyn: wow. david lee, thanks. >>> well, a homeowner shoots a pair of teenagers as they are breaking into his house, but now the prosecutors say he shot them, quote, in a manner that goes way beyond self-defense. trace gallagher walks us exactly through what happened. kelly's court debates, and you will decide who was in the right and who was in the wrong. >>> and president ronald reagan took office saying we needed to downsize government and dramatically cut federal spending, but in order or to make it happen
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